Short Films, Hands-On Workshops, and Additional Artworks Join ‘Color Code,’ McEvoy Arts’ Fifth Anniversary Exhibition

Petra Cortright, KRNKNKSSNBTRGVRGLCH_archive.LZ, 2015. Digital painting on Sunset Hot Press Rag paper. McEvoy Family Collection. Courtesy of the artist
Petra Cortright, KRNKNKSSNBTRGVRGLCH_archive.LZ, 2015. Digital painting on Sunset Hot Press Rag paper. McEvoy Family Collection. Courtesy of the artist
Richard Diebenkorn, Untitled, c. 1986. Gouache and charcoal on joined paper. McEvoy Family Collection. © Richard Diebenkorn Foundation
Richard Diebenkorn, Untitled, c. 1986. Gouache and charcoal on joined paper. McEvoy Family Collection. © Richard Diebenkorn Foundation

San Francisco, CA. August 18, 2022 – McEvoy Foundation for the Arts announces new programs for Color Code (September 23, 2022–January 21, 2023), its fall exhibition about the many expressions of color in the arts. Marking the organization’s fifth anniversary, Color Code presents modern and contemporary artworks from the McEvoy Family Collection and commissions by Bay Area colorists Sadie Barnette, Angela Hennessy, Clare Rojas, and Zio Ziegler. The exhibition is joined by Visible Light, an original program of short films about color as light, and a series of hands-on workshops that give attendees opportunities to connect with their inner color spectrum through color meditation and discover new identities through costume design.

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EXHIBITION

For many visual artists, filmmakers, and designers, color is a tool used to connects us to the stories, cultures, and values embedded in their works. Color Code brings painting, sculpture, and photography from the McEvoy Family Collection together with new commissions in an exhibition that features a variety of expressions and applications of color.

Each of the four commissioned Bay Area artists has developed an original presentation that expresses their unique approach to color. Barnette’s installation is a rainbow tribute to family that celebrates connection and legacy. Hennessy’s tableaus bring forth the complicated racial and colonialist histories embedded in black and gold. Inspired by her roots in printmaking, Rojas’s portraits of a girl play with the ways in which palette can alter space, character, and mood. And Ziegler’s paintings are as complex as the imaginary landscapes of Hieronymous Bosch, delving into memory as a fiction in the digital age.

“It has been a deeply satisfying experience to organize and share this exhibition and its related programs with the world,” says McEvoy Arts executive director Susan Miller. “In assembling this show, we’ve encountered so many talented artists and designers who use color powerfully in their creative practices. It has also given us an opportunity to explore the McEvoy Family Collection from a fresh angle and bring works together that reveal the power of color in art. Color is all around us, and so often we take it for granted—Color Code seeks to create a space to contemplate its varied meanings, whether widely shared or deeply personal.”

Works from the McEvoy Family Collection include examples by rigorous colorists Etel Adnan and Richard Diebenkorn whose work addresses color’s psychological and optical effects. David Alekhuogie and Gordon Parks use color to frame personal narratives and amplify historical voices. Photographers Bruce Davidson and Marilyn Minter focus their lens on specific clothing and makeup choices, illustrating color’s key role in identity and self-fashioning. Minimalist sculptors Donald Judd and Katharina Fritsch use monochrome palettes to pin one color in space and scrutinize how shifts in light alter saturation levels.

Color Code artists make deliberate choices about how much color to use, with some using a limited palette to harness the power and potential of a single color, as in Rico Gatson’s lime-green rays to illuminate Aretha Franklin’s aura, and others engaging a wide spectrum to unify disparate parts, as in Spencer Finch’s annotated grid of seventy colors from the Technicolor classic The Wizard of Oz. From the delight of the unexpected reds and oranges that give dimension to Wayne Thiebaud’s shadows, to the awe of the immersive swirl of colors that Petra Cortright sources from the internet and uses as “paint” in her digital paintings, Color Code celebrates how color holds a wealth of feelings, ideas, and stories within it that are unveiled if we’re willing to look close enough.

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FILM
Visible Light, a program of short films expands the exhibition’s themes into the realm of moving images, runs daily. This two-part, two-hour program features more than a dozen 20th and 21st century films by filmmakers from all over the globe. The first program, Aberration, features experimental films that explore shifting spectrums over time and various deviations in color representation. It is followed by Meditation, a program of contemplative works designed to inspire and delight in projected luminescence.

Visible Light is guest curated by San Francisco Exploratorium’s film curators Samuel Sharkland, Liz Keim, and Kathleen Maguire.

I. Aberration

Alfred, Esther Urlus, 2019/20, 6 min.

Attraction, Emily Scaife, 2019, 5 min.

CMYK, Marv Newland, 2011, 7 min.

45 7 Broadway, Tomonari Nishikawa, 2013, 5 min.

Girls on Film, Julie Buck and Karin Segal, 2006, 8 min.

Glistening Thrills, Jodie Mack, 2013, 8 min.

Hillocks, Maria Constanza Ferreira, 2021, 3 min.

3 Degree K #2, Lilian Schwartz, 1982, 4 min.

Study in Color and Form, Jonathan Gillie, 2015, 4 min.

Terra Incognita, Kerry Laitala, 2009, 9 min.

II. Meditation
Because the Sky is Blue, Wenhua Shi, 2020, 4 min.

In Waking Hours, Sarah Vanagt and Katrien Vanagt, 2015, 18 min.

Light Year, Paul Clipson, 2013, 10 min.

Two Space, Larry Cuba, 1979, 8 min.

when the East of the day meets the West of the night, Yuge Zhou, 2020, 14 min.

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WORKSHOPS

Color Code’s hands-on workshops provide opportunities for participants to further explore the role color plays in their lives, and learn more about their personal color palettes.

Head Bangers

Saturday, October 8, 2pm

Experimental drag performance trio Toxic Waste Face leads an interactive characterization workshop exploring how color informs identity. With a series of character prompts and a one-of-a-kind crafting materials, participants make their own original masks to unlock new perspectives on self-expression, stereotypes, and pop culture.   Toxic Waste Face is known for their collective examination of issues of contemporary gender identity and social performance through explorations of the fantastic, the grotesque, and the colorful.

Your Intuitive Colorscape

Saturday, November 12, 2pm

Textile artist and author Lise Silva Gomes hosts an introspective color experience. Through projected color fields, guided meditation, and open-ended creative exercises, participants unlock chromatic memories that point them towards a personal color language they can bring into their daily lives.  Working in a community-grounded art practice, Gomes fosters an environment of mutual support that prioritizes ethics in craft and reveals the power of visualization as a creative tool.

Space at these events is very limited. Tickets go on sale approximately one month before each workshop. Visit mcevoyarts.org/events for more information.

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McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes present in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in the McEvoy Arts gallery, film screenings and exhibitions, as well as music, literary, and performing arts events each year.

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts is located at 1150 25th Street, Building B, San Francisco, CA 94107 and is open to the public Wednesday–Saturday, 11:00am–6:00pm. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more information, visit mcevoyarts.org.

‘Color Code,’ McEvoy Arts’ Fifth Anniversary Exhibition, Explores How Color Shapes Our World 

Spencer Finch, Study for Back to Kansas, 2014
Spencer Finch, Study for Back to Kansas, 2014
McEvoy Arts’ Fifth Anniversary Exhibition Explores How Color Shapes Our World

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts announces its fifth anniversary exhibition, Color Code, a presentation of modern and contemporary artworks that explore, challenge, and expand on the various ways in which color is used to convey meaning and elicit emotion. Color Code features four new commissions by Bay Area artists Sadie Barnette, Angela Hennessy, Clare Rojas, and Zio Ziegler,alongside dozens of works from the McEvoy Family Collection.  

The newly commissioned presentations by Barnette, Hennessy, Rojas, and Ziegler add fresh perspectives on the ways in which artists intentionally approach color choices to connect ideas and tell a story. These new works supplement a wide array of painting, sculpture, and photography from the collection by such visionaries as Etel Adnan, Ricci Albenda, David Alekhuogie, William Eggleston, Spencer Finch, Justine Kurland, Marilyn Minter, Gordon Parks, and David Benjamin Sherry, among others. By drawing upon these diverse perspectives, Color Code assembles a world-class group of artists who think deeply, and in different ways, about color.  

Over the centuries, theories about color abound in both art and science. Aristotle held that God sent down color from the heavens as celestial rays. Sir Isaac Newton’s experiments with prisms led him to declare that the real basis for visible color is in light itself, building a color system that is linked to musical notation. Contemporary color theories hold that hue is color, but black and white are not. In the wilder corners of humanity’s relationship with color, hunts for the perfect hue have resulted in lawsuits over color ownership, and the creation of brilliant but toxic colors like vermillion and Scheele’s green have endangered the artists that use them. From ancient practices like the mining of lapis luzuli to contemporary methods of creating synthetic colors in laboratories, our behavior indicates that our fascination with creating color is unlikely to end.  

For visual artists, filmmakers, and designers, color is a tool that connects us to the ideas, stories, histories, cultures, and values embedded in their works. Color patterns and systems speak to us as much as words and symbols when reading a visual work of art. And even as artists make such intentional choices about color, their work is still perceived slightly differently by each person, community, and culture, speaking to color’s specific yet open-ended appeal.  

Color Code brings all these histories and meanings together to consider the ways in which color can bind us together and pull us apart. Sadie Barnette’s installation is a rainbow tribute to family that celebrates connection and legacy. Angela Hennessy’s tableaus bring forth the complicated racial and colonialist histories embedded in black and gold. Inspired by her roots in printmaking, Clare Rojas’s portraits of a girl play with the ways in which palette can alter space, character, and mood. And Zio Ziegler‘s paintings are as complex as the imaginary landscapes of Hieronymous Bosch, delving into the notion that memory is a fiction in the digital age.  

Color Code includes a program of short films in the Screening Room, organized by the Exploratorium’s film curators Liz Keim, Samuel Sharkland, and Kathleen Maguire. Live workshops and demonstrations by artists and designers will be announced. Visit mcevoyarts.org for information.

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Sadie Barnette is an Oakland-based multimedia artist who explores the personal and the political through images and installations that reference her family history. She has had solo exhibitions at institutions including The Kitchen, New York; The Lab, San Francisco; the Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco; and MCA San Diego. Barnette has been awarded grants and residencies by the Carmago Foundation in France, the Headlands Center for the Arts, and the Studio Museum in Harlem, among others. She is the inaugural Artist Fellow at UC Berkeley’s Black Studies Collaboratory and holds a BFA from CalArts and an MFA from UC San Diego.   

Angela Hennessy is an Oakland-based artist who uses a color, light, and gestures of domestic labor to expose latent mythologies of identity. Her work has been included in exhibitions at institutions such as the Contemporary Jewish Museum, Museum of the African Diaspora, and SOMArts, pt. 2 Gallery. Hennessy has been featured in Sculpture Magazine, The New Yorker, Surface Design Journal, among others. Hennessy is an Associate Professor at California College of the Arts and is certified in the Grief Recovery Method.   

Clare Rojas is a San Francisco-based artist who explores storytelling and abstraction through her highly personal visual language. She has had solo exhibitions at institutions including CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art, San Francisco; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; and Savannah College of Art and Design. Rojas has been awarded grants and residencies from Artadia, Eureka Fellowship, and the Headlands Center for the Arts, among others. She holds a BFA in printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA in painting from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.    

Zio Ziegler is a Marin County-based artist whose large-scale works investigate form, human perception, and consciousness. He has had solo exhibitions at institutions including Allouche Benias Gallery, Athens, Greece; Ever Gold [Projects], San Francisco; Marin Museum of Contemporary Art; and Ochi Projects, Kethum, Idaho. His murals have been commissioned in cities around the world, including San Francisco, Tokyo, and London. Ziegler teaches at Stanford University and holds a BFA in painting from the Rhode Island School of Design.

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McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes present in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in the McEvoy Arts gallery, new media programs in the Screening Room, as well as many film, music, literary, and performing arts events each year. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more information, please visit mcevoyarts.org.  

Image Credit: Spencer Finch, Study for Back to Kansas, 2014. Acrylic and pencil on paper. McEvoy Family Collection. Courtesy of James Cohan.

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High-resolution images and additional materials are available by request

Media Contacts:

Wendy Norris, Norris Communications
wendy@norriscommunications.biz
415.307.3853

Bill Proctor, McEvoy Foundation for the Arts
bproctor@mcevoyarts.org or press@mcevoyarts.org
415.549.7689

MYR’s Public Programs Explore Humanity’s Relationship with the Natural World


Experimental Musical Performance and In-Depth Conversation Both Focus on Transformation of the Human Body to Achieve Greater Balance Our Environment

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, June 15, 2022 — McEvoy Foundation for the Arts is pleased to announce two in-person live events to be presented in conjunction with its current exhibition MYR (May 27 – August 27, 2022). These events thoughtfully supplement the artworks on view in a variety of media that creatively explore deep time, natural stewardship, and human existence. On August 6, electronic musicians Red Culebra will present a newly commissioned expansion of their ongoing multimedia performance Let Us Speak Frog. On August 27, exhibition artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg and writer Annalee Newitz will join us to discuss their shared interest in biotechnology as a place for important conversations about human futures, in art, fiction, and reality.

Guest curator Elizabeth Thomas notes, “Much like artworks in the gallery exhibition, Red Culebra’s performance posits an empathetic relationship to the natural world as a means for evolving together and repairing the damages humanity has wrought, bringing us to this point of climate emergency. Grounded in real science, Heather and Annalee both imagine futures that see biotechnology as both a way to augment the human body, and will offer an expanded discussion of the increasingly blurring lines between the natural and the unnatural, ethically, philosophically, and in practice.”

Visit mcevoyarts.org for tickets and information. At this time, face coverings are required to be worn at all times while inside the McEvoy Arts galleries for visitors two and older, regardless of vaccination status. Updates to health and safety policies can be found at mcevoyarts.org/visit.

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Red Culebra, image courtesy of the artists

Let Us Speak Frog
Red Culebra
Saturday, August 6 • 7:00pm

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, 1150 25th Street, San Francisco, CA 94107
$15 general admission / $12 students and seniors: https://www.mcevoyarts.org/event/red-culebra-let-us-speak-frog/


Let Us Speak Frog
is an experimental music and multi-media performance. Responding to the Holocene extinction—the ongoing extinction event caused by human activity—electronic synthesizer duo Red Culebra uses generative composition to speak non-human languages and explore imagined ecologies. At this event, Red Culebra will premiere their two-hour durational performance during which time audiences will witness two musicians transform themselves, via sound, into flying snakes. As snakes, they will visit and attempt to apologize to frogs throughout the world. In addition, Red Culebra will collaborate with animator Christoph Steger and choreographer Gerald Casel to expand the telling of their story with interactive animated projection and live dance choreography.

Red Culebra is an electronic synthesizer duo and collaboration of Bay Area electronic musicians and performance artists gal*in_dog (aka Guillermo Galindo) and Cristóbal Martínez. Red Culebra’s performance art includes sound invocations, moving images, and movement by performers. Inspired by their complicated Post-Mexican backgrounds, Galindo and Martinez create and perform rituals based on cycles of repetition and uniformity. The sonic, graphic, and repetitive nature of their work requires both endurance and determination from their audiences, while denying participating publics the opportunity to fetishize ceremony.  Founded in San Francisco, Red Culebra has performed throughout the Bay Area at venues including the San Francisco Art Institute, The Lab, BAMPFA, and Southern Exposure.

Heather Dewey-Hagborg, photo by Ana Brigada; Annalee Newitz, photo by Sarah Deragon

In Conversation: Heather Dewey-Hagborg and Annalee Newitz
Saturday, August 27 • 3:00pm

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, 1150 25th Street, San Francisco, CA 94107
Free with registration: https://www.mcevoyarts.org/event/heather-dewey-hagborg-annalee-newitz/

Join artist and biohacker Heather Dewey-Hagborg and science writer Annalee Newitz for a lively conversation exploring the generative intersection of art and science. Dewey-Haborg’s 2019 installation Lovesick, on view in MYR, was made in collaboration with research scientists and depicts a custom retrovirus that increases production of oxytocin (the “love hormone”) in the human body. Newitz explores both science fiction and nonfiction in their award-winning articles, books, and podcasts. Together, the two will discuss the ethics of approaching science through the lens of art and other “unscientific” methods. This conversation is co-presented with the Exploratorium, where Dewey-Hagborg is Artist-in-Residence.

Dr. Heather Dewey-Hagborg is an artist who is interested in art as research and technological critique. Dewey-Hagborg has shown work internationally at venues including SFMoMA, the World Economic Forum, the Guangzhou Triennial, and the Walker Center for Contemporary Art. Her work is held in public collections at the Centre Pompidou and the Victoria and Albert Museum, among others, and has been widely discussed in outlets such as the New York Times and Artforum. Dewey-Hagborg is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Interactive Media at NYU Abu Dhabi and an Artist-in-Residence at the Exploratorium. She holds a PhD in Electronic Arts from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Annalee Newitz writes science fiction and nonfiction. They are the author of the book Four Lost Cities: A Secret History of the Urban Age, and the novels The Future of Another Timeline, and Autonomous, which won the Lambda Literary Award. As a science journalist, they are a writer for the New York Times and elsewhere, and have a monthly column in New Scientist. Newitz has also published in The Washington Post, Slate, Popular Science, Ars Technica, and The Atlantic, among others, and is the co-host of the Hugo Award-winning podcast Our Opinions Are Correct. They hold a Ph.D. in English and American Studies from UC Berkeley.

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MYR is a multimedia art exhibition exploring deep time, natural stewardship, and human existence. The artists on view bring science and speculation together to explore how deeper visions of space and time relate to contemporary existential anxieties, particularly the imminent climate emergency. Taking its title from the unit of measurement equaling one million years used in earth sciences and astronomy, MYR presents diverse creative approaches to depicting the intersection of time, space, and life. The result thoughtfully de-centers humanity and instead places Earth as the protagonist of its story. For more information, visit mcevoyarts.org.

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McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes present in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in the Foundation’s gallery, new media programs in the Screening Room, as well as many film, music, literary, and performing arts events each year. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more health, safety, and admissions information, please visit mcevoyarts.org/visit.

Image credits: Red Culebra photos courtesy of the artists, Heather Dewey-Hagborg photo by Ana Brigada, Annalee Newitz photo by Sarah Deragon.

‘MYR’ Explores the Vastness of Time Through Scientific Fact and Speculative Fiction

Opening Reception
Saturday, June 4, 5–7pm

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts is pleased to announce the upcoming spring opening of MYR, an exhibition of multi-media sensorial artworks exploring the impact of humans on the planet, nature, and climate change. Featuring an international selection of artists, the exhibition considers the concept of deep time in relation to both past and future human hazards, anxieties, and potential survival through a range of creative viewpoints informed by science and technology.

Guest curated by Elizabeth Thomas, MYR borrows its title from the commonly used abbreviation in earth sciences and astrology for a unit of measurement equaling a million years. Within that context, the exhibition draws particular focus on the Anthropocene epoch, the period in which human industrialized activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment. Through immersive works, moving images, and animated and interactive sculpture, scientific fact and speculative fiction compel consideration of such theories and concepts including augmentation of human emotions through biological intervention, future study of humanity’s physical remains, and the perception of non-linear time.

Thomas notes, “The vastness of geologic time stretching backwards remains an abstract truth, while its reach into the future is increasingly apocalyptic as humans confront the climate crisis. To imagine the millions of years behind us, we must also imagine the millions that might pass after us, on earth and throughout the universe. MYR features artists who manifest the spectrum of deep time, both past and future, proving art’s power to contend with the biggest of ideas and the most abstract states.”

The artists featured in MYR represent several distinct approaches to the study of time, space, and life. A floating sculpture by Tomás Saraceno offers the possibility of ecological harmony through spatial unification. Speculative landscapes by Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg and Candice Lin depict scenes of abundant flora and fauna—both on and beyond Earth—that might thrive in the absence of human dominance over the environment. Heather Dewey-Hagborg utilizes video and sculpture to explore the viability of biological intervention to alter and augment human feelings and engender a version of utopia.

Amy Balkin’s ongoing archival project collects what “will have been” from places around the globe that may literally disappear due to forces of climate change, including sea level rise, erosion, desertification, and glacial melt. Whereas works by Katie Paterson consider how the abstract, non-linear essence of time can be perceived and portrayed through text and kinetic sculpture. MYR includes a program of films, running concurrently in the Screening Room, that further explore the exhibition’s themes.

“The breadth and depth of the McEvoy Family Collection,” notes McEvoy Arts executive director Susan Miller, “provides the ability to articulate upon contemporary global conversations within the visual arts and create opportunities to facilitate timely discussions and moments of personal contemplation around issues of climate change, social justice, and even speculative futures, as well as art history, language, pop-culture, and politics.”

Complementing the MYR exhibition, a related series of public programs will focus on specific actions underway and further actions needed to address climate change locally and globally.

MYR is on view from May 27 through August 27, 2022. A public opening reception is scheduled for Saturday, June 4, 5–7pm. Admission to McEvoy Arts is free.

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Elizabeth Thomas is a Bay Area-based independent curator and writer and a Senior Lecturer in Curatorial Practice at California College of the Arts, San Francisco. She was previously Director of Public Programs at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and MATRIX Curator at BAMPFA, where she considered central questions of interdisciplinarity, experimentation, and political and social engagement through commissioned research-based projects with artists. Other exhibitions she has organized include The F-Word at the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Empathetic at the Temple Gallery of Art, Philadelphia; and The Believers at MASS MoCA, North Adams. She holds a BA in Anthropology from George Washington University and a MA in Contemporary Art History, Theory and Practice from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Artists

Amy Balkin is an artist whose works propose alternatives for conceiving the public domain outside current legal and discursive systems, addressing property relations, environmental justice, and equity in the context of climate change. Her work has been exhibited in Sublime (Centre Pompidou Metz), Hybris (MUSAC), Rights of Nature (Nottingham Contemporary), and dOCUMENTA (13), and published in Decolonizing Nature (Sternberg), Materiality (Whitechapel/MIT) and Critical Landscapes (UC Press). She lives in San Francisco.

Heather Dewey-Hagborg is an artist and biohacker who is interested in art as research and technological critique. Her controversial biopolitical art practice includes the project Stranger Visions in which she created portrait sculptures from analyses of genetic material (hair, cigarette butts, chewed gum) collected in public places. Dewey-Hagborg has a PhD in Electronic Arts from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Interactive Media at NYU Abu Dhabi, a Sundance Institute Interdisciplinary Program Art of Practice Fellow, an Artist-in-Residence at the Exploratorium, and an affiliate of Data & Society.

Dr. Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg is an artist examining our fraught relationships with nature and technology. Through artworks, writing, and curatorial projects, Ginsberg’s work explores subjects as diverse as artificial intelligence, synthetic biology, conservation, biodiversity, and evolution, as she investigates the human impulse to “better” the world. She read architecture at the University of Cambridge, was a visiting scholar at Harvard University, and received her MA in Design Interactions from the RCA.

Candice Lin is an interdisciplinary artist who works in installation, sculpture, drawing, ceramics, and video. Her work is multi-sensorial and often includes living and organic materials and processes. Lin lives and works in Los Angeles, California. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Art at the UCLA School of Arts and Architecture.

Katie Paterson is known for her multi-disciplinary and conceptually driven work with an emphasis on nature, ecology, geology, and cosmology. Collaborating with scientists and researchers across the world, Paterson’s projects consider our place on Earth in the context of geological time and change. She received her BA from Edinburgh College of Art, Edinburgh, United Kingdom in 2004 and her MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art in London, United Kingdom in 2007.

Tomás Saraceno is a contemporary Argentine artist whose projects—consisting of floating sculptures, international collaborations, and interactive installations—propose and engage with forms of inhabiting and sensing the environment that have been suppressed in the Capitalocene era.

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McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes and ideas in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in McEvoy Arts’ gallery, new media programs in the Screening Room, as well as many film, music, literary, and performing arts events each year. Exhibitions are free and open to the public.

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts Spring 2022 Live Events Feature Modern and Contemporary Perspectives on the Self

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts proudly announces three distinctive Spring public programs that explore modern and contemporary perspectives on the self and representation. From February through April, 2022, visit McEvoy Arts to see the exhibition Image Gardeners and experience these related events that include a film screening, panel, and live performance about and by a diverse group of guest artists, curators, and scholars. The programs address topics as varied as the direct intimacy of analog film to the whimsical potential of inter-galactic performance. Tickets go on sale in January 2022.

The series kicks off on Saturday, February 5 with LIVING IN MIRRORS: the life that belongs to me, a program of short films from 1966 to 2019 that explore the diversity of women’s voices in film in 16mm and digital formats. On Saturday, March 5, Person. Woman. Camera. TV. is a conversation on the body and the camera with pioneering media artist Lynn Hershman Leeson and feminist scholar Peggy Phelan. Andon Saturday, April 30, McEvoy Arts presents the premiere of Genevieve Quick’s Hello World, a radical sci-fi fantasy of Otherness told via a live performance and video game.

Spring 2022 programs are presented in conjunction with Image Gardeners (January 14 – April 30, 2022), the McEvoy Arts exhibition thatjoins a broad selection of photography by women and non-binary artists from the McEvoy Family Collection with new commissions by three local artists to probe a spectrum of aesthetics and personal expression through portraiture. In the Screening Room, Gina Basso guest curates seen only, heard only through someone else’s description, a related program of experimental films that explore how images and narratives construct meaning, artifice, and memory.

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McEvoy Arts Public Programs
February – April 2022

Film Screening
LIVING IN MIRRORS: the life that belongs to me

Saturday, February 5, 2022 • 6pm | McEvoy Foundation for the Arts
$10 General Admission • $7 Seniors (65+) and Students with ID

This program features short films in 16mm and digital formats by women artists who turn the cameras on themselves and others to activate interior worlds. Illustrating the endless possibilities of film and the moving image, the selected filmmakers envision the screen as fertile ground for examination and construction of the self and collective selves. LIVING IN MIRRORS is guest curated by filmmaker and curator Gina Basso and San Francisco Cinematheque director Steve Polta. Films by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Julie Dash, Anne Charlotte Robertson, and Stephanie Barber, among others, are presented.  

LIVING IN MIRRORS is co-presented with San Francisco Cinematheque.

Conversation
Person. Woman. Camera. TV.

Saturday, March 5, 2022 • 3pm | McEvoy Foundation for the Arts
Free with registration

Lynn Hershman Leeson’s arresting photograph Seduction (1986) is the jumping off point for an illustrated discussion on technology and the female body led by curator Corey Keller. Hershman Leeson, whose pioneering work has long investigated the impact of technology on society and the self, is joined on the panel by Peggy Phelan, a renowned feminist scholar whose work in the field of performance studies is foundational.

Performance
Hello World

Saturday, April 30, 2022 • 6pm | McEvoy Foundation for the Arts
$15 General Admission • $12 Seniors (65+) and Students with ID

Genevieve Quick’s Hello World is about CETI (Celadonian Extraterrestrial Intelligence), a research consortium that facilitates communication between Planet Celadon and Earth. As the narrative unfolds in a live performance and video game, the cast of self-identified Asian American women encounter a black hole, the multiverse, and communication outages that they attempt to remedy. Hello World offers a two-way channel between earth and the multiverse, a bridge across time, and a metaphor for the Asian diaspora.

For registration and ticket information, visit www.mcevoyarts.org/events. All events are presented in accordance with current health guidelines.

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Participant Biographies

Gina Basso is a San Francisco-based independent film programmer and visual artist. She has organized programs for San Francisco movie houses including The Roxie Theater, The Castro Theater, and Alamo Drafthouse. She has curated programs for Design Within Reach, San Francisco, CA; Hunter’s Point Shipyard, San Francisco, CA; and the Northwest Film Forum, Seattle, WA and is the former film curator for San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. In her creative practice, she uses video to explore transitional or altered states of being. Her video work has been presented by San Francisco Cinematheque’s Crossroads Festival; Artist Television Access, San Francisco; the Roxie Theater; HAXAN Film Festival; Antimatter Experimental Film Festival Vancouver, BC; and online via publicrecords.nyc.

Lynn Hershman Leeson is an American artist and filmmaker whose work transgresses art, social commentary, technology, and media. Her work has been exhibited in galleries and museums internationally, including the New Museum, New York; The Tate Modern, London; and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco. Her films have been exhibited at the Berlin Film Festival, Sundance Film Festival, and Toronto International Film Festival, among others. Her work is held in collections including the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. She is the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, Prix ars Electronica, and Siggraph Lifetime Achievement Award. She lives and works in San Francisco and New York.

Corey Keller is a historian of photography and independent curator based in Oakland. From 2003 to 2021, she served as curator of photography at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) where her exhibitions included monographic surveys on Dawoud Bey, John Beasley Greene, and Francesca Woodman as well as the thematic exhibits About Time: Photography in a Moment of Change and Brought to Light: Photography and Invisibility, 1840-1900. Recent writings include essays on Eliza Withington, Susan Meiselas, and Clare Strand. She has lectured and taught widely, and is currently adjunct professor in the photography program at California College of the Arts (CCA).

Peggy Phelan is the Ann O’Day Maples Chair in the Arts and Professor of Theater & Performance Studies and English at Stanford University. Her widely influential work covers an extensive range of subjects including feminism, photography, dance, film, music, and poetry. She most recently edited, contributed to, and co-curated with Richard Meyer Contact Warhol: Photography Without End (MIT Press and Cantor Art Center, 2018). Phelan has been President of Performance Studies International, a fellow of the Getty Research Institute, and a Guggenheim Fellow. 

Steve Polta is the director of San Francisco Cinematheque. He is a co-founder and current curator of Cinematheque’s CROSSROADS film festival, presented annually since 2010. He holds an MFA in Filmmaking from the San Francisco Art Institute and a Masters of Library and Information Science (MLIS) from San José State University. He is co-editor, with Brett Kashmere, of Craig Baldwin: Avant to Live! documenting the film and curatorial work of the Bay Area artist to be co-published by Cinematheque and INCITE Journal of Experimental Media in 2022. He lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Genevieve Quick is a San Francisco-based interdisciplinary artist and critic whose work explores global identity and politics in speculative narratives, technology, and media-based practices. She has exhibited at institutions including the Wattis Institute, San Francisco; Asian Cultural Center, Gwangju, South Korea; and Asian Art Museum, San Francisco. Quick has been awarded visual arts residencies at Headlands Center for the Arts, Recology, and the de Young Museum, among others. She has contributed essays and reviews to publications including 48 Hills, Artforum, cmagazine, and Art Practical.

‘Image Gardeners’ Cultivates Diverse Perspectives on Selfhood and Womanhood

Short Film Program Showcases Interdisciplinary Work of Women and Non-Binary Artists 

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts is pleased to announce Image Gardeners, an exhibition of modern and contemporary photography from the McEvoy Family Collection that challenges photographic conventions of representation in order to cultivate alternative visions of selfhood and womanhood. Newly commissioned presentations by Marcel Pardo Ariza, Carolyn Drake, and Chanell Stone create an intergenerational dialogue among the works on view that reveal personal perspectives on gender, race, and identity. In the Screening Room, Gina Basso guest curates the related program of short films by and about women and non-binary artists, titled seen only, heard only through someone else’s description. Both exhibitions are on view from January 14 through April 30, 2022. Admission to McEvoy Arts is free.

An “image gardener” describes a camera operator who maintains a prolonged involvement with its subject or medium in order to realize a photograph. In opposition to Susan Sontag’s theory that photography is a voracious way of seeing, image gardeners invest time and care into their craft and employ photographic seeing as a means of cultivation and preservation. Avant-garde artists Zoe Leonard, Susan Meiselas, Lorna Simpson, Francesca Woodman, and others utilize self-presentation, appropriation, collaboration, and experimental processes to reflect, reframe, and resist commonly held notions of figures behind and in front of the camera.

As we navigate a renaissance of self-portraiture in the form of digital photography and social media, this exhibition offers insight into the wide spectrum of gender-expansive aesthetics developed over the past eight decades. Striking examples from the McEvoy Family Collection’s extensive holdings of portraits, combined with the three commissions, showcase a chorus of women and non-binary artists as both operators of the camera and its primary subject. Diane Arbus’s Self-portrait, pregnant, N.Y.C. (1945) is an intimate look at the artist recognizing herself and the transformation of her body while newly commissioned self-portraits by Marcel Pardo Ariza present the artist post-surgery as they experience the transition of becoming alongside trans kin.

Commissioned artist Chanell Stone debuts black and white analog self-portraits, reframing her body’s relationship to landscape vis-à-vis her ancestral lineage and the erasure of Black histories. Contemporary Collection artists Stephanie Syjuco and Zunele Muholi demonstrate how identity and history is further signified via decoration, textiles, and ethnographies. 

Lorna Simpson and Erica Baum reconstruct and manipulate found photographic materials, yielding experimental works in which fragments of women’s bodies are concealed and revealed in novel attempts to resist the gaze. Carolyn Drake’s subversive series Knit Club presents symbols of domesticity and femininity, within the daily environments of a group of women in Water Valley, Mississippi, all while obscuring their faces and personhood. Together these photographs rearrange our expectations of gender and portraiture, rejecting and flattening existing visual tropes to assert the maker’s agency and authorship over their bodies and their craft. 

Along with the Screening Room program seen only, heard only through someone else’s description, Image Gardeners includes a series of public conversations, film screenings, and performances to be announced. Image Gardeners is curated by Sara Wessen Chang, McEvoy Arts’ exhibitions and public programs curator.

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Screening Room
seen only, heard only through someone else’s description
January 14 – April 30, 2022

sair goetz, me and my army (still), 2018, 11 min., color, sound. Courtesy of the artist

In conjunction with Image Gardeners, this two-part program of short films, organized by curator and filmmaker Gina Basso, features a multiplicity of images and narratives across space and time to pose urgent questions about temporality, artifice, and memory. Basso takes the program’s title from the 1977 poem Audience Distant Relative by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha (1951–1982). Inspired by Cha’s performance and mail art piece of the same name that used language to unravel dynamics of distance, visibility, hearing and communication, the poem resurfaced in Basso’s consciousness just as the pandemic was quickly becoming less abstract and more of a looming reality in our lives.

seen only, heard only through someone else’s description engages filmmakers and artists whose interdisciplinary practices draw from performance, film, photography, research, and writing. The program includes experimental short films made by women and non-binary artists from the 1970s through the 2010s, presented in two separate sessions Session One – Portraits and Fleeting Glimpses: Sometimes We Stand Alone explores personal identity and history through experimental processes and found footage. Session Two – Drawing Energy: Collectives, Communities and Lineage is concerned with communities of women and their collective power to document and deeply engage with artistic, cultural, or familial lineages. 

Sessions One and Two screen sequentially, for eight weeks each. Featured filmmakers include Brenda Contreras, Rita Ferrando, sair goetz, Onyeka Igwe, Lily Jue Sheng, Lucy Kerr, Marie Losier, Deborah Stratman, Tina Takemoto, and Paige Taul, among others. A complete listing of films is to be announced.

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Contributors

Marcel Pardo Ariza (they/them) is a trans Colombian artist and curator exploring the relationship of representation, kinship, and queerness through constructed photographs and installations. Their work has been exhibited at the San Francisco Arts Commission Galleries; Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, Palm Springs Art Museum; De:Formal Gallery, New York; NoPlace Gallery, Columbus, OH; and Ochi Projects, Los Angeles, CA. Ariza is the recipient of the 2020 San Francisco Artadia Award, Tosa Studio Award, and a Murphy & Cadogan Contemporary Art Award. They are a former member of the Curatorial Council at Southern Exposure, and studio member at Minnesota Street Project. Ariza lives and works in Emeryville, CA.

Carolyn Drake (she/her) works on long-term photo-based projects that question historical narratives to creatively reimagine them. Her work has been exhibited in solo presentations at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Houston Center for Photography, among others. Her series Knit Club was published as an artist’s monograph by TBW Books (2020). It was shortlisted for the Paris Photo Aperture Book of the Year and Lucie Photo Book Awards. She is member of Magnum Photos and recipient of the 2021 Henri Cartier Bresson Award, a Guggenheim fellowship, the Lange-Taylor Prize, a Lightwork residency, and a Fulbright fellowship, among others. She lives and works in Vallejo, CA. 

Chanell Stone (she/her) is an artist and photographer whose work challenges insular views of Blackness often by exploring the Black body’s connection to the American landscape. Her work is in the collections of the KADIST Foundation, San Francisco and Paris, France; Center for Photography at Woodstock, Woodstock, NY; and Meyer Library, Oakland, CA. She has exhibited at the Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco, CA; SF Camerawork, San Francisco, CA; and the Aperture Foundation, New York, NY, among others. She lives and works in Oakland, CA and San Diego, CA.

Gina Basso (she/her) is a San Francisco-based independent film programmer and visual artist. She has organized programs for revered San Francisco movie houses including The Roxie Theater, The Castro Theater, and Alamo Drafthouse. Additionally, she has curated programs for Design Within Reach, San Francisco, CA; Hunter’s Point Shipyard, San Francisco, CA; and the Northwest Film Forum, Seattle, WA and is currently the film curator for San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Her video work has been presented in the Bay Area at San Francisco’s Cinematheque’s Crossroads Festival, Artist Television Access, San Francisco, the Roxie Theater, HAXAN Film Festival, Antimatter Experimental Film Festival, and online via publicrecords.nyc. She was the 2017 recipient of a Curatorial Travel Grant for film research awarded by the French American Cultural Society and San Francisco French Consulate.

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McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes present in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in the Foundation’s gallery, new media programs in the Screening Room, as well as many film, music, literary, and performing arts events each year. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more information, please visit mcevoyarts.org.

Celebrando la Cultura: Los Cenzontles in Watsonville Honors Mexican American Music, Culture, and Bay Area Farmworkers

Friday, September 17, 2021 • 6pm
Watsonville City Plaza
Presented by McEvoy Foundation for the Arts and Los Cenzontles Cultural Arts Academy with the Watsonville Film Festival

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, Los Cenzontles Cultural Arts Academy and the Watsonville Film Festival celebrate Mexican Independence Day and the region’s community of essential farmworkers with Celebrando la Cultura, a free outdoor concert in Watsonville City Plaza on Friday, September 17 at 6pm. The concert features performances by Los Cenzontles and other Mexican American cultural organizations. Celebrando la Cultura is organized in conjunction with Next To You an exhibition of artworks from the McEvoy Family Collection that encourages community connection through visual and performing arts. A virtual showcase of Los Cenzontles’ films, including a screening of the award-winning documentary Linda and the Mockingbirds, is available from September 15 through 18 via the Watsonville Film Festival.

Celebrando la Cultura celebrates the creative impact of Mexican American music and dance on the region’s performing arts traditions, as well as the essential labor of agricultural workers in the Pajaro Valley. The concert coincides with the weekly Watsonville farmers market and features traditional folk music and dance performances by Los Cenzontles, Los Originarios del Plan (presenting Tierra Caliente and Arpa Grande music), and the Watsonville-based Estrellas de Esperanza youth folkloric group. Additional support is provided by the City of Watsonville and the Watsonville Campesino Appreciation Caravan, a volunteer-run organization that provides assistance and support to farmworkers in Watsonville. Organizers have partnered with the nonprofit healthcare organization Salud Para La Gente to provide a mobile vaccination clinic to concert attendees.

“We are thrilled to partner with Los Cenzontles and McEvoy Arts to present this beautiful program,” says Consuelo Alba, director and co-founder of the Watsonville Film Festival. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to celebrate Mexican-American culture, honor our farmworkers for their essential work and build bridges between urban and rural communities.”

Extending the celebration nationally, the Watsonville Film Festival organizes a virtual showcase of documentary films featuring Los Cenzontles, (“mockingbirds” in the Nahuatl language), a Bay Area-based artist-driven nonprofit, band, arts academy, and production studio committed to amplifying the roots of Mexican culture. Screening September 15–18, Linda and The Mockingbirds (2020) pairs acclaimed musician Linda Ronstadt with musician Jackson Browne and a busload of Cenzontles to journey to Banámichi in Sonora, Mexico, where Ronstadt’s grandfather was born. The film details Ronstadt’s long friendship with Eugene Rodriguez, a third-generation Mexican-American and musician who founded Los Cenzontles thirty years prior. The virtual screening follows the film’s recent theatrical premiere in July 2021 at San Francisco’s Roxie Theater, co-produced by McEvoy Arts. A Zoom panel discussion about Los Cenzontles’ extensive short film catalogue with Rodriguez and invited directors is scheduled for Thursday, September 16 at 6pm.

Celebrando la Cultura and the Watsonville Film Festival program delivers the power of traditional Mexican folk music to stage and screen,” says Rodriguez. “The concert is Los Cenzontles’ first live appearance together in more than a year—we’re looking forward to sharing the dignity and beauty of this traditional music with families in Watsonville.”

Virtual Screening: Linda and the Mockingbirds
September 15–18, 2021 | www.watsonvillefilmfest.org

Zoom Panel: Los Cenzontles and Filmmakers in Conversation
Thursday, September 16, 2021 • 6pm | www.watsonvillefilmfest.org

Celebrando la Cultura: Los Cenzontles in Watsonville
Friday, September 17, 2021 • 6pm | City Plaza • 358 Main St, Watsonville, CA

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Partners

Los Cenzontles is a grassroots artist-driven organization committed to amplifying the roots of Mexican culture through classes, events, media, and performances. Founded in San Pablo, CA in 1994 by musician and educator Eugene Rodriguez, Los Cenzontles provides the local community with a family-friendly setting for traditional arts education and cultural events. The Los Cenzontles Academy connects students of all ages with maestros of traditional Mexican genres instilling a sense of cultural pride and participation in living traditions. Our full calendar of events features performances by our students, our own professional touring group, Los Cenzontles, and well-known world musicians and visiting artists. Los Cenzontles documents this journey of continuing the long tradition of authentic Mexican art with CDs and DVDs to share with the world and future generations.

Estrellas de Esperanza is a youth folkloric group that has been performing throughout Santa Cruz County and beyond over the past 13 years. Estrellas members not only learn traditional dance steps, they also learn about the different regions the dances come from and their history, ultimately instilling pride of culture, language, and music in the youth. Founder and maestra, Ruby Vasquez has an extensive background having danced for Esperanza del Valle for 34 years. Because of her deep passion for traditional dance and music, Ruby often brings Maestros from Mexico to teach the youth authentic dances not often seen in the area.

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes present in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in the Foundation’s gallery, new media programs in the Screening Room, as well as many film, music, literary, and performing arts events each year. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more health, safety, and admissions information, please visit mcevoyarts.org.

The Watsonville Campesino Appreciation Caravan is a volunteer-run organization providing much-needed and much-deserved supplies, information, food, and appreciation to farmworkers in Watsonville. The group is made up of community members, educators, and students who provide crucial information about health & safety regarding COVID19 and resources that are available to them in the Watsonville community. Every penny of the funds they raise goes directly to local farmworkers and their families via https://gofund.me/877ba13a.

The City of Watsonville is located ninety-five miles south of San Francisco and has 51,000 residents. It is a rich agricultural community famous for its fresh berries, apples, and cut flowers. Watsonville, located in the lush Pajaro Valley, offers an ideal climate and the small-town charm of a rural community. Watsonville is more importantly recognized for its ethnic and cultural diversity, history of activism, generations of artists, dancers, and filmmakers. More than 80% of its population is Latino, and 31.5% of its population is under nineteen years of age.

The Watsonville Film Festival showcases Latinx filmmakers and stories that illuminate our shared humanity and inspire positive change. Founded in 2012, WFF developed from a grassroots collective into a non-profit arts organization offering year-round programming that celebrates powerful filmmaking and local creativity. WFF strives to make its programs accessible to all, leveraging the power of film to build bridges, spark conversations and imagine new possibilities in the heart of the Monterey Bay.

Lawrence Weiner: OUT OF SIGHT Highlights Playful Themes in Next to You Exhibition

Presented by McEvoy Foundation for the Arts and Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture with Minnesota Street Project

OUT OF SIGHT, an interactive social sculpture by American conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner, highlights the whimsical themes of McEvoy Foundation for the Arts’ exhibition Next to You and encourages community connection through visual and performing arts. The installation, organized in San Francisco by the Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture (FMCAC) in partnership with McEvoy Arts and the Exploratorium, enjoys concurrent presentations at FMCAC’s Marina campus and the Exploratorium. OUT OF SIGHT is on view from October 16, 2021 through January 22, 2022 in the Atrium of 1275 Minnesota Street Project, San Francisco, CA 94107. Admission is free, Tuesday–Saturday, 11am–6pm.

Known for text-based works that recall visual poetry, literary aphorisms, or Zen koans, Weiner frequently transforms gallery walls into artistic messaging boards. In his ground-based mural OUT OF SIGHT, he addresses the viewer with phrases within a simple hopscotch pattern board, creating a pathway to be viewed and navigated, both physically and intellectually. Similar to the McEvoy Family Collection artworks currently on view in Next to You, OUT OF SIGHT celebrates the potential within all of us to connect with ourselves and reconnect with each other through visual arts.

OUT OF SIGHT is a sorely needed dose of cultural medicine at this time,” says Susan Miller, McEvoy Arts’ executive director. “As the arts continue to recover from the setbacks in the pandemic, collaboration across institutions such as this are ever more important in rebuilding our arts’ ecosystems.”

OUT OF SIGHT has been described as a “generic sculpture” that can adapt itself to different institutions, distinct sites, and specific language communities and has been shown in public spaces including the Chicago Park District; the downtown shopping district of Kortrijk, Belgium; the Pérez Art Museum in Miami; and the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia. Suitable for exploration by families and children, the San Francisco installations are offered in English, Spanish, and Mandarin, creating accessible spaces to safely gather and play together again.

Frank Smigiel, FMCAC’s director of arts programming and partnerships, adds: “Weiner’s OUT OF SIGHT shows how artists continually reimagine where their work can live and what their work can do. In a city with a long history of public art, this work brings Fort Mason and its network of partners into those larger conversations about what art out in the community can spark.”

Lawrence Weiner: OUT OF SIGHT at 1275 Minnesota Street is produced by McEvoy Arts with support of the Minnesota Street Project. The formal unveiling at FMCAC is scheduled for Friday, September 17, 2021, followed by installations at the Exploratorium in late September and October 16 at 1275 Minnesota Street. Concurrent with OUT OF SIGHT at FMCAC, two new commissions will debut the same day: Wat Walls, a painting suite by East Bay muralist Thitiwat Phromratanapongse; and Kindred Swell, a site-specific dance by San Francisco-based choreographer and dancer Kim Ip. And in partnership with BOXBLUR and Immersive Arts Alliance, FMCAC will serve as a key viewing station for Shimon Attie’s Night Watch, a floating visual art installation passing through the San Francisco Bay featuring images of political asylum refugees projected onto a giant LED screen.

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About the Artist

Lawrence Weiner is considered a central figure in the development of conceptual art during the 1960s and is renowned for his predominantly language-based artworks, which he presents as sculpture. He attended the New York public school system and spent the late 1950s and early 1960s venturing across the United States, Mexico, and Canada. Solo exhibitions of his work have been held at Museo Nivola, Orani, Italy; Pérez Art Museum, Miami, FL; Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI; Kunsthaus Bregenz, Bregenz, Austria; Regen Projects, Los Angeles, CA; Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona, Spain; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. He participated in documenta 5, 6, 7, and 13; the 36th, 41st, 50th and 55th Venice Biennales; and the 27th Biennale de Sao Paulo. He has received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts; a Guggenheim Fellowship; the Wolfgang Hahn Prize;, a Skowhegan Medal for Painting/Conceptual Art; and an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Weiner divides his time between his studio in New York City and his boat in Amsterdam.

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Partners

Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture (FMCAC), a decommissioned military installation converted into a nonprofit cultural center, hosts a lively mix of arts, educational, and cultural programming. Each year FMCAC provides more than $2 million in support to local arts organizations, enabling groups to produce diverse and innovative artworks at the historic waterfront campus. With a nearly four-decade history as an arts and culture destination, FMCAC is now focused on reinvigorating its programming and amenities to better engage the evolving Bay Area creative community. Central to this new vision is the commissioning and presentation of adventurous and unconventional artworks best realized in nontraditional or historic settings. For more information, visit fortmason.org.

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes present in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in the Foundation’s gallery, new media programs in the Screening Room, as well as many film, music, literary, and performing arts events each year. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more health, safety, and admissions information, please visit mcevoyarts.org.

Minnesota Street Project, located in San Francisco’s historic Dogpatch district, offers economically sustainable spaces for art galleries, artists, and related nonprofits. Inhabiting three warehouses, the Project seeks to retain and strengthen San Francisco’s contemporary art community in the short term, while developing an internationally recognized arts destination in the long term. Founded by entrepreneurs and collectors Deborah and Andy Rappaport, Minnesota Street Project was inspired by the couple’s belief that philanthropic support for the arts today requires an alternate model – one suited to the innovative nature of Silicon Valley and the region as a whole. For more information, visit minnesotastreetproject.com.

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts Showcases a Plurality of Bay Area Artist Networks in Next to You Fall Events

Music, Dance, Film, and Cultural Heritages Take Center Stage in Collaborations with Center for Asian American Media, CounterPulse, Los Cenzontles, Tiny Dance Film Festival, and Watsonville Film Festival

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, July 20, 2021 — McEvoy Foundation for the Arts is pleased to announce a series of collaborative live engagements from September through November throughout the San Francisco Bay Area, in conjunction with its current exhibition, Next to You (May 28 – December 4, 2021). The events enrich the artworks on view from the McEvoy Family Collection and their depictions of dance, theater, music, circus arts, film, and other creative forms, by inviting interdisciplinary networks of artists and institutions to create collective spaces for reconnection. From the city of Watsonville to the historic Castro Theatre in San Francisco, the upcoming events celebrate pillars of the Bay Area’s performing arts communities, their ongoing contributions, and the return of the region’s live art experiences.

“Next to You events intend to encourage exploration of the exhibition’s core themes and ideas, to help us rebuild and find community through the performing arts,” says Susan Miller, McEvoy Arts executive director. With rich offerings of live programming in dance, music, and film, there is truly something for everyone as we return to a vibrant, artistic Bay Area.”

McEvoy Arts’ Fall event season launches on Saturday, September 11 with Radius, a music and dance performance hosted by CounterPulse in collaboration with McEvoy Arts. Set in relation to the urban surroundings of McEvoy Arts, this site-specific and improvisational performance sees a troupe of experimental dancers move and respond to a group of electronic musicians, and vice versa. Informed by the Bay Area’s long history as a hub of improvisational and experimental art, Julie Phelps, artistic & executive director of CounterPulse and a principal performer, aims to create a temporary zone governed by collaboration and fluidity rather than hierarchy and structure.

Radius comes at a time when many performers in the live arts have been uncharacteristically estranged from the stage and group collaborations during the pandemic,” says Phelps. “On one level the aim of this project is simple: to reunite performers with strong personal improvisational practices spanning music and dance—showcasing our plural communities, reinvesting in artist peer networks, and engaging audiences hungry for live, body-based art. Beyond that, this project is part of larger artistic inquiries exploring emergent dynamics between bodies and transdisciplinary co-creation as a study of radical solidarity and inventive social connection.”

From September 15–18 the Watsonville Film Festival reprises a virtual screening of the award-winning documentary Linda and the Mockingbirds,following the film’s theatrical premiere on July 18 at the Roxie Theater, co-produced by McEvoy Arts and Los Cenzontles Cultural Arts Academy. Featuring acclaimed musicians Linda Ronstadt, Jackson Browne, and Los Cenzontles, the film documents their musical journey to Banámichi in Sonora, Mexico, where Ronstadt’s grandfather was born. Celebrando la Cultura: Los Cenzontles in Watsonville, a free, outdoor concert in Watsonville City Plaza on Friday, September 17 at 6pm, accompanies the virtual screening in honor of Mexican Independence Day. The concert celebrates the vibrancy of the Pajaro Valley’s agricultural community and farmworkers, featuring musica del campo by Los Cenzontles, Tierra Caliente music with Arpa Grande by Los Originarios del Plan, and dance performances by the Watsonville-based Estrellas de Esperanza youth folkloric group.

“We are thrilled to partner with Los Cenzontles and McEvoy Arts to present this beautiful program,” says Consuelo Alba, director and co-founder of the Watsonville Film Festival. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to celebrate Mexican-American culture, honor our farm workers for their essential work and build bridges between urban and rural communities.”

On Sunday, October 3, McEvoy Arts joins forces with the Center for Asian America (CAAM) for A Filipino American Heritage Month Celebration at San Francisco’s historic Castro Theatre. The local, creative Filipinx American community takes center stage with a slate of new films, live performances, and conversations. With the Castro Theatre closed for over a year due to the pandemic, the day’s schedule (to be announced) marks one of the first programs at the landmark venue for independent arts organizations in the Bay Area.

Closing out its Fall events on Sunday, November 7, McEvoy Arts and the Tiny Dance Film Festival return to the Roxie Theater with We Belong, a selection of international and local short dance films that revel in the joy, eccentricity, and variety of human connection. Curated by Tiny Dance founders Kat Gorospe Cole and Eric Garcia this cross-genre lineup features Bharatanatyam, hip hop, and contemporary dance.

We Belong is a love letter to human connection,” says Kat Gorospe Cole, co-founder of Tiny Dance Film Festival. “It reminds me of how we create spaces for kinship, laughter, playfulness and solace with each other—things that have felt all the more important to me over the last year. May the joy we feel in this program propel us toward the continued work for equity.

Further program details are to be announced at mcevoyarts.org. For registration and ticket information, visit mcevoyarts.org/events. All in-person events are presented in accordance with current health guidelines.

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September – November 2021
Performing Arts Events

Radius
Saturday, September 11, 2021 • 2pm | McEvoy Foundation for the Arts, San Francisco
Free with registration at mcevoyarts.org and counterpulse.org

How can dance and music reveal the dichotomies of intimacy and power? By empowering experimental dancers and electronic musicians, CounterPulse artistic and executive director Julie Phelps aims to create a temporary zone governed by collaboration and fluidity rather than hierarchy and structure. Influenced by and set in relation to the urban surroundings of McEvoy Arts, this site specific and improvisational performance is the first event of the CounterPulse Festival (September 9–18). Responding to both harmony and discord, Radius is a rehearsal of being with—with ourselves and our senses, with other people, and with the land. Following the presentation at McEvoy Arts, CounterPulse explores Radius within the rural environment of the Djerassi Artistic Residency Program on Saturday, September 18 in conjunction with Network, a project by Krista DeNio >> Moving Ground.

A co-production of McEvoy Arts and CounterPulse.

Free Concert: Celebrando la Cultura: Los Cenzontles in Watsonville
Friday, September 17, 2021 • 6pm | Watsonville City Plaza, Watsonville, CA

Virtual Screening: Linda and the Mockingbirds
September 15–18, 2021 | watsonvillefilmfest.org 

In this documentary by award-winning director and producer James Keach, Ronstadt, musician Jackson Browne, and a busload of Cenzontles journey to Banámichi in Sonora, Mexico, where Ronstadt’s grandfather was born. In honor of Mexican Independence Day, the virtual screening is augmented by a free, outdoor concert in Watsonville City Plaza during the weekly farmers’ market on Friday, September 17, featuring music by Los Cenzontles and Los Originarios del Plan, and a dance performance by the Watsonville-based Estrellas de Esperanza youth folkloric group. The event honors the impact of Mexican music and culture on the Bay Area’s performing arts traditions and celebrates the vibrancy of the Pajaro Valley’s agricultural community and farmworkers. Additional support for Celebrando la Cultura is provided by the City of Watsonville and the Watsonville Campesino Appreciation Caravan.

A co-production of McEvoy Arts and Los Cenzontles Cultural Arts Academy, with the Watsonville Film Festival.

A Filipino American Heritage Month Celebration
Sunday, October 3, 2021 | Castro Theatre, San Francisco
Tickets to be announced at mcevoyarts.org and caamedia.org

The local creative Filipinx American community takes center stage to kick off Filipino Heritage Month with a slate of new films, live performances, and conversations. With the Castro Theatre closed due to the pandemic, the day’s schedule (to be announced) marks one of the first programs at the landmark venue for nonprofit organizations in the Bay Area. Furthermore, this event honors the service of the Bay Area Filipino community in the healthcare industry throughout the pandemic.

A co-production of McEvoy Arts and the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM).

We Belong
November 7, 2021 | Roxie Theater, San Francisco
Tickets to be announced at mcevoyarts.org and detourdance.com.

We Belong presents a selection of international short dance films that revel in the joy, eccentricity, and variety of human connection. Curated with a sensitivity to accessibility and inclusivity, this cross-genre lineup features Bharatanatyam, hip hop, and contemporary dance. Subjects range from Black trans femme love to the Chinese diaspora and language to the irreverence of office furniture—each offering a refreshing alternative to dominant narratives. This program is curated by Kat Gorospe Cole and Eric Garcia, founders of the Tiny Dance Film Festival, a San Francisco-based festival that prioritizes films that embrace brevity, embody the concept of dance with the camera, and amplify marginalized voices.

A co-production of McEvoy Arts and the Tiny Dance Film Festival, with the Roxie Theater.

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Partners

The Center for Asian American Media (CAAM) has been dedicated for 40 years to presenting stories that convey the richness and diversity of Asian American experiences to the broadest audience possible. As a nonprofit organization, CAAM funds, produces, distributes, and exhibits works in film, television, and digital media. CAAMFest, formerly the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival (SFIAAFF), celebrates the world’s largest showcase for new Asian American and Asian film, food, and music programs. CAAM is the recipient of the 2021 Peabody Award for the co-production of PBS documentary series Asian Americans.

Los Cenzontles Cultural Arts Academy is a grassroots artist-driven organization committed to amplifying the roots of Mexican culture through classes, events, media, and performances. Founded in San Pablo, CA in 1994 by musician and educator Eugene Rodriguez, Los Cenzontles provides the local community with a family-friendly setting for traditional arts education and cultural events. The Los Cenzontles Academy connects students of all ages with maestros of traditional Mexican genres instilling a sense of cultural pride and participation in living traditions. Our full calendar of events features performances by our students, our own professional touring group, Los Cenzontles, and well-known world musicians and visiting artists. Los Cenzontles documents this journey of continuing the long tradition of authentic Mexican art with CDs and DVDs to share with the world and future generations.

CounterPulse is building a movement of risk-taking art that shatters assumptions and builds community. It provides space and resources for emerging artists and cultural innovators, serving as an incubator for the creation of socially relevant, community-based art and culture. CounterPulse acts as a catalyst for art and action; creating a forum for the open exchange of art and ideas, catalyzing transformation in our communities and our society. It works towards a world that celebrates diversity of race, class, cultural heritage, artistic expression, ability, gender identity, and sexual orientation and strives to create an environment that is physically and economically accessible to everyone.

The Roxie Theater, a San Francisco landmark in the Mission District that reopens in May 2021, brings people together to meet and connect through distinctive cinematic experiences. Guided by the passionate belief that engaging with a movie doesn’t end with the credits, the Roxie invites filmmakers, curators, entertainers and educators to interact with our audiences. The Roxie provides inspiration and opportunity for the next generation and serves as a forum for the independent film community reflecting the spirit of the diverse Bay Area population.

Tiny Dance Film Festival is a film festival based in San Francisco that features short dance films from across the globe. Founded in 2013, TDFF prioritizes films that upset the trend, stretch into new territory, challenge dominant narratives, and embrace brevity.

The Watsonville Film Festival showcases Latinx filmmakers and stories that illuminate our shared humanity and inspire positive change. Founded in 2012, WFF developed from a grassroots collective into a non-profit arts organization offering year-round programming that celebrates powerful filmmaking and local creativity. WFF strives to make its programs accessible to all, leveraging the power of film to build bridges, spark conversations and imagine new possibilities in the heart of Monterey Bay.

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Exhibition & Screening Room

Next to You
May 28 – December 4, 2021

Next to You is an exhibition of modern and contemporary artworks from the McEvoy Family Collection that celebrates the joy, vitality, and healing power of the performing arts. As the world emerges from the coronavirus pandemic and its requisite isolation, Next to You acts as a farewell ballad to a strange and challenging time and a look towards a future where we are reunited. With the performing arts cultural sector largely inaccessible during the pandemic, the exhibition showcases dance, theater, music, circus arts, film, and other creative forms.

In the Screening Room, Alison O’Daniel guest curates Hearing Aids, a program of short films and videos that consider a new sensory sensitivity to our surroundings and a greater awareness of the body’s intricacies of communication. The films, spanning the 1970s to the 2010s, explore sensory experience in relation to topics as varied as urban surveillance, the natural landscape, and Indigenous history. Session 1 screens daily from May 28 through August 31, 2021.  Session 2 debuts September 1 and runs through December 4, 2021.

•••

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes present in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in the Foundation’s gallery, new media programs in the Screening Room, as well as many film, music, literary, and performing arts events each year. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more health, safety, and admissions information, please visit mcevoyarts.org/visit.

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High-resolution images and additional materials are available by request to press@mcevoyarts.org or wendy@norriscommunications.biz.

Additional Press Contacts:

Center for Asian American Media
Masashi Niwano, Festival & Exhibitions Director
publicity@caamedia.org

Los Cenzontles
Dave Millar, Director of Marketing & Communications
dave@loscenzontles.com  

CounterPulse
Justin Ebrahemi, Director of Communications & Advancement
justin@counterpulse.org

Watsonville Film Festival
Consuelo Alba, Executive Director
consuelo@watsonvillefilmfest.org 

Tiny Dance Film Festival
Eric Garcia, Co-founder
detourdance@gmail.com

Linda and the Mockingbirds Screens Live in San Francisco and Virtually via Watsonville Film Festival with Free Concert

Los Cenzontles Cultural Academy and McEvoy Foundation for the Arts
Celebrating Regional Performing Arts for McEvoy Arts’ Next to You Exhibition

Roxie Theater, San Francisco • July 18, 2021
Watsonville Film Festival • September 15–18, 2021
Plus Celebrando la Cultura Concert, Watsonville • September 17, 2021

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, July 8, 2021 McEvoy Foundation for the Arts and Los Cenzontles Cultural Arts Academy are pleased to participate in community-benefit screenings of the award-winning documentary Linda and the Mockingbirds in conjunction with the exhibition Next To You, on view at McEvoy Arts through December 4, 2021. The film screens first on Sunday, July 18 at San Francisco’s Roxie Theater. From September 15–18, the Watsonville Film Festival presents a virtual screening and joins McEvoy Arts and Los Cenzontles to present Celebrando la Cultura, a free outdoor evening concert in the Watsonville City Plaza on Friday, September 17, featuring performances by Los Cenzontles and additional Mexican-American cultural organizations.

Linda and The Mockingbirds (2020) pairs acclaimed musician Linda Ronstadt with Los Cenzontles (“mockingbirds” in the Nahuatl language), a Bay Area-based artist-driven nonprofit, band, arts academy, and production studio committed to amplifying the roots of Mexican culture. In this documentary by award-winning director and producer James Keach, Ronstadt, musician Jackson Browne, and a busload of Cenzontles journey to the little town of Banámichi in Sonora, Mexico, where Ronstadt’s grandfather was born. The film details Ronstadt’s long friendship with Eugene Rodriguez, a third-generation Mexican-American and musician who founded Los Cenzontles thirty years prior with the mission to reconnect working-class kids with the dignity and beauty of their ancestral music and culture. Along the way, the pounding feet of zapateado dancers, the strumming of jarana and guitar, the clacking buzz of the quijada, a donkey jawbone, and a chorus of soulful voices celebrate pride and self-knowledge with a solid, rootsy groove. “This is not Latin-ish ‘Dorito music,’ Ronstadt says of the film’s musical backbone. ‘This is Mexican music.’”

The Roxie Theater hosts a community screening of the film with cast and crew in attendance on Sunday, July 18 at 2pm. With the moviegoing experience disrupted by the pandemic, the event offers a first viewing on the big screen for many of the children, performers, and families featured in Linda and the Mockingbirds. Preceding the film is Good Morning Aztlan(2002) directed by Les Blank and Maureen Gosling and featuring Los Cenzontles. Tickets, on sale now, range from $9-10. Children 11 and under are admitted free while supplies last.

“We are honored that Linda and the Mockingbirds will enjoy its theatrical premiere at the Roxie, in collaboration with McEvoy Foundation for the Arts,” says Eugene Rodriguez, founder and director of Los Cenzontles. “Our community of artists and students will finally be able to celebrate its release together while sharing it with the public.”

From September 15–18, 2021, in honor of Mexican Independence Day, Linda and the Mockingbirds is available to watchonline at www.watsonvillefilmfest.org. The online screening is augmented by Celebrando la Cultura: Los Cenzontles in Watsonville, a free, outdoor concert in Watsonville City Plaza during the weekly farmers’ market at 6pm on Friday, September 17. The concert features performances by Los Cenzontles, Los Originarios del Plan (presenting Tierra Caliente and Arpa Grande music), and a dance performance by the Watsonville-based Estrellas de Esperanza, a youth folkloric group. Celebrando la Cultura is a co-production of Los Cenzontles and McEvoy Arts with the Watsonville Film Festival. Additional support is provided by the City of Watsonville and the Watsonville Campesino Appreciation Caravan. The event honors the impact of Mexican music and culture on the Bay Area’s performing arts traditions and celebrates the vibrancy of the Pajaro Valley’s agricultural community and farmworkers.

“We are thrilled to partner with Los Cenzontles and McEvoy Arts to present this beautiful program,” says Consuelo Alba, director and co-founder of the Watsonville Film Festival. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to celebrate Mexican-American culture, honor our farm workers for their essential work and build bridges between urban and rural communities.”

“It’s time to sing the praises of the Bay Area’s landmark performing arts community, known around the world and yet silent throughout the pandemic,” adds Susan Miller, executive director of McEvoy Arts. “Let’s come together safely to celebrate the pleasure and delight of live arts experiences and discover how it feels to dance, laugh, and play together again.”

Next to You (through December 4, 2021) presents artworks from the McEvoy Family Collection that celebrate the joy, vitality, and healing power of the performing arts. The exhibition includes the Screening Room program Hearing Aids, a two-session program of short films about the senses and communication, guest curated by Alison O’Daniel,and a series of live engagements in collaboration with a diversity of cultural arts organizations. Additional partners include the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM), CounterPulse, Kronos Performing Arts Association, and Tiny Dance Film Festival.

Community Screening: Linda and the Mockingbirds
Sunday, July 18, 2021 • 2pm | Roxie Theater, San Francisco
$10 General Admission • $9 Seniors w/ ID | Free admission for children 11 and under

Virtual Screening: Linda and the Mockingbirds
September 15–18, 2021 | www.watsonvillefilmfest.org

Celebrando la Cultura: Los Cenzontles in Watsonville
Friday, September 17, 2021 • 6pm | Watsonville City Plaza, Watsonville, CA

For registration and ticket information, visit www.mcevoyarts.org/events. All live events are presented in accordance with current health guidelines.

•••

Program Partners

Los Cenzontles is a grassroots artist-driven organization committed to amplifying the roots of Mexican culture through classes, events, media, and performances. Founded in San Pablo, CA in 1994 by musician and educator Eugene Rodriguez, Los Cenzontles provides the local community with a family-friendly setting for traditional arts education and cultural events. The Los Cenzontles Academy connects students of all ages with maestros of traditional Mexican genres instilling a sense of cultural pride and participation in living traditions. Our full calendar of events features performances by our students, our own professional touring group, Los Cenzontles, and well-known world musicians and visiting artists. Los Cenzontles documents this journey of continuing the long tradition of authentic Mexican art with CDs and DVDs to share with the world and future generations.

Estrellas de Esperanza is a youth folkloric group that has been performing throughout Santa Cruz County and beyond over the past 13 years. Estrellas members not only learn traditional dance steps, they also learn about the different regions the dances come from and their history, ultimately instilling pride of culture, language, and music in the youth. Founder and maestra, Ruby Vasquez has an extensive background having danced for Esperanza del Valle for 34 years. Because of her deep passion for traditional dance and music, Ruby often brings Maestros from Mexico to teach the youth authentic dances not often seen in the area.

The Roxie Theater, a San Francisco landmark in the Mission District that reopens in May 2021, brings people together to meet and connect through distinctive cinematic experiences. Guided by the passionate belief that engaging with a movie doesn’t end with the credits, the Roxie invites filmmakers, curators, entertainers and educators to interact with our audiences. The Roxie provides inspiration and opportunity for the next generation and serves as a forum for the independent film community reflecting the spirit of the diverse Bay Area population.

The Watsonville Campesino Appreciation Caravan is a volunteer-run organization providing much-needed and much-deserved supplies, information, food, and appreciation to farmworkers in Watsonville. The group is made up of community members, educators, and students who provide crucial information about health & safety regarding COVID19 and resources that are available to them in the Watsonville community. Every penny of the funds they raise goes directly to local farmworkers and their families via https://gofund.me/877ba13a.

The City of Watsonville is located ninety-five miles south of San Francisco and has 51,000 residents. It is a rich agricultural community famous for its fresh berries, apples, and cut flowers. Watsonville, located in the lush Pajaro Valley, offers an ideal climate and the small-town charm of a rural community. Watsonville is more importantly recognized for its ethnic and cultural diversity, history of activism, generations of artists, dancers, and filmmakers. More than 80% of its population is Latino, and 31.5% of its population is under nineteen years of age.

The Watsonville Film Festival showcases Latinx filmmakers and stories that illuminate our shared humanity and inspire positive change. Founded in 2012, WFF developed from a grassroots collective into a non-profit arts organization offering year-round programming that celebrates powerful filmmaking and local creativity. WFF strives to make its programs accessible to all, leveraging the power of film to build bridges, spark conversations and imagine new possibilities in the heart of the Monterey Bay.

•••

Exhibition & Screening Room

Next to You (May 28 – December 4, 2021) is an exhibition of modern and contemporary artworks from the McEvoy Family Collection that celebrates the joy, vitality, and healing power of the performing arts. As the world emerges from the coronavirus pandemic and its requisite isolation, Next to You acts as a farewell ballad to a strange and challenging time and a look towards a future where we are reunited. With the performing arts cultural sector largely inaccessible during the pandemic, the exhibition showcases dance, theater, music, circus arts, film, and other creative forms.

In the Screening Room, Alison O’Daniel guest curates Hearing Aids, a program of short films and videos that consider a new sensory sensitivity to our surroundings and a greater awareness of the body’s intricacies of communication. The films, spanning the 1970s to the 2010s, explore sensory experience in relation to topics as varied as urban surveillance, the natural landscape, and Indigenous history. Session 1 screens daily from May 28 through August 31, 2021.  Session 2 debuts September 1 and runs through December 4, 2021.

•••

McEvoy Foundation for the Arts presents exhibitions and events that engage, expand, and challenge themes present in the McEvoy Family Collection. Established in 2017, McEvoy Arts creates an open, intimate, and welcoming place for private contemplation and public discussion about art and culture. Rooted in the creative legacies of the San Francisco Bay Area, McEvoy Arts embodies a far-reaching vision of the McEvoy Family Collection’s potential to facilitate and engage conversations on the practice of contemporary art. McEvoy Arts invites artists, curators, and thinkers with varied perspectives to respond to the Collection. Each year, these collaborations produce exhibitions in the Foundation’s gallery, new media programs in the Screening Room, as well as many film, music, literary, and performing arts events each year. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more health, safety, and admissions information, please visit mcevoyarts.org/visit.

###

High-resolution images and additional materials are available by request to press@mcevoyarts.org or wendy@norriscommunications.biz.

Additional Press Contacts:

Los Cenzontles
Dave Millar, Director of Marketing & Communications
dave@loscenzontles.com

Watsonville Film Festival
Consuelo Alba, Executive Director
consuelo@watsonvillefilmfest.org